Seven false and heretical positions that the Pope directly or indirectly upholds, according to the filial correction authors

The 79 clergy and lay scholars who authored the filial correction list a dozen passages from Amoris Laetitia that they say “serve to propagate seven heretical propositions.”

Included in the list is the “smoking” footnote 351 where the Pope writes that those living in an objective situation of sin can receive the “help of the sacraments” to grow in the life of grace and charity. Many have interpreted this to mean that civilly-divorced-and-remarried Catholics living in adultery can receive Holy Communion, and the Pope has endorsed guidelines allowing this. Also included in the list is the text pertaining to couples living in adultery who, the Pope writes, see their situation as “what God himself is asking” of them, despite falling short of the “objective ideal.”

The scholars say that these passages along with a number of “words, deeds and omissions” of the Pope are “serving to propagate heresies within the Church.”

According to the signers, the “words, deeds and omissions” of Pope Francis that promote heresy include:

  • Refusing to answer the dubia (five yes-or-no questions) submitted by the four cardinals (two of whom are now deceased) asking him to confirm that Amoris Laetitia does not abolish five teachings of the Catholic faith.
  • Forcibly intervening at the 2015 Synod of the Family where he insisted on inserting into a midterm report a proposal (that did not receive sufficient votes) to allow communion for adulterers and a proposal that pastors should emphasize the “positive aspects” of lifestyles the Church considers gravely sinful, including civil remarriage after divorce and premarital cohabitation.
  • Endorsing an interpretation of the exhortation by Vienna Cardinal Christoph Schönborn that allows for Holy Communion to be given to adulterers.

Seven Heresies 

The Catholic clergy and lay scholars go on to list seven “false and heretical propositions” which they say Pope Francis “directly or indirectly” upholds through his “words, deeds, and omissions.” These seven propositions, listed below, are summaries of the positions which they attribute to Pope Francis and deem to be heretical.

1) A justified person has not the strength with God’s grace to carry out the objective demands of the divine law, as though any of the commandments of God are impossible for the justified; or as meaning that God’s grace, when it produces justification in an individual, does not invariably and of its nature produce conversion from all serious sin, or is not sufficient for conversion from all serious sin.

2)  Christians who have obtained a civil divorce from the spouse to whom they are validly married and have contracted a civil marriage with some other person during the lifetime of their spouse, who live more uxorio [as husband and wife] with their civil partner, and who choose to remain in this state with full knowledge of the nature of their act and full consent of the will to that act, are not necessarily in a state of mortal sin, and can receive sanctifying grace and grow in charity.

3)  A Christian believer can have full knowledge of a divine law and voluntarily choose to break it in a serious matter, but not be in a state of mortal sin as a result of this action.

4) A person is able, while he obeys a divine prohibition, to sin against God by that very act of obedience.

5) Conscience can truly and rightly judge that sexual acts between persons who have contracted a civil marriage with each other, although one or both of them is sacramentally married to another person, can sometimes be morally right or requested or even commanded by God.

6) Moral principles and moral truths contained in divine revelation and in the natural law do not include negative prohibitions that absolutely forbid particular kinds of action, inasmuch as these are always gravely unlawful on account of their object.

7) Our Lord Jesus Christ wills that the Church abandon her perennial discipline of refusing the Eucharist to the divorced and remarried and of refusing absolution to the divorced and remarried who do not express contrition for their state of life and a firm purpose of amendment with regard to it.

The clergy and scholars state that these “propositions all contradict truths that are divinely revealed, and that Catholics must believe with the assent of divine faith.” They add that it is “necessary” that such heresies be “condemned by the authority of the Church,” on account of the “great and imminent danger” they cause to souls.

A Biblical Precedent

St. Thomas Aquinas taught in Summa Theologiae that faithful Catholics have a duty to correct an erring prelate:

If the faith were endangered, a subject ought to rebuke his prelate even publicly. Hence Paul, who was Peter’s subject, rebuked him in public, on account of the imminent danger of scandal concerning the faith, and, as the gloss of Augustine says on Gal. 2:11, Peter gave an example to superiors, that if at any time they should happen to stray from the straight path, they should not disdain to be reproved by their subjects.

The signers conclude the letter, writing: “At this critical hour, therefore, we turn to the cathedra veritatis [seat of truth], the Roman Church, which has by divine law pre-eminence over all the churches, and of which we are and intend always to remain loyal children, and we respectfully insist that Your Holiness publicly reject these propositions, thus accomplishing the mandate of our Lord Jesus Christ given to St Peter and through him to all his successors until the end of the world: ‘I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and thou, being once converted, confirm thy brethren.’” ∎

Pete Baklinski, Lifesite News

79 Clergy and Lay Scholars Issue Filial Correction of Pope Francis for ‘Propagating Heresies’

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Bishop Rene Henry Gracida, D.D., Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of Corpus Christi in Texas, added his name to the list of signatories of the filial correction.

Expressing “profound grief” and “filial devotion,” 79 Catholic clergy and lay scholars from more than 20 countries around the world have issued what they are calling a “Filial Correction” to Pope Francis for “propagating heresy.

The Filial Correction, in the form of a 25-page letter, bears the signatures of seventy-nine Catholic clergy, academics, researchers, and scholars in various fields  from   twenty countries. They assert that Pope Francis has supported heretical positions about marriage, the moral life, and the Eucharist that are causing a host of “heresies and other errors” to spread throughout the Catholic Church.

The correction was delivered to the Pope at his Santa Marta residence on August 11, 2017. No similar action has taken place within the Catholic Church since the Middle Ages, when Pope John XXII was admonished for errors which he later recanted on his deathbed.

“With profound grief, but moved by fidelity to our Lord Jesus Christ, by love for the Church and for the papacy, and by filial devotion  toward yourself, we are compelled to address a correction to Your Holiness on account of the propagation of heresies effected by the apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia and by other words, deeds and omissions of Your Holiness,” the signers write in the letter.

“We issue this correction…to protect our fellow Catholics — and those outside the Church, from whom the key of knowledge must not be taken away — hoping to prevent the further spread of doctrines which tend of themselves to the profaning of all the sacraments and the subversion of the Law of God,” they add.

The signers respectfully insist that Pope Francis condemn the heresies that he has “directly or indirectly upheld,” and that he teach the truth of the Catholic faith in its integrity.  The letter was made public on September 24, six weeks after the signers received no response from the Pope. The Filial Correction and its signatories, along with a summary statement and press release, can be viewed at http://www.correctiofilialis.org.

23 Priests, Religious and Bishops Sign the Filial Correction

Priests

Photo shows four (4) of the priests who signed the filial correction (from left): Fr. Linus Clovis, Msgr. Prof. Antonio Livi, Fr Serafino M. Lanzetta, and Rev. Glen Tattersall

Although the Filial Correction was principally led by lay scholars from various Catholic universities around the world, clergy are openly invited to participate and give their support to the initiative by going to the website.  As of this writing, out of the 79 signatories, 23 were priests and religious, including one bishop who added his name to the list.

The first bishop to add his name to the list was Most Reverend Rene Henry Gracida, D.D., Bishop Emeritus of the Diocese of Corpus Christi.  Bishop Gracida even added together with his electronic signature a message of support to the organizers of the filial correction: “I extend my congratulations and gratitude to the originators of the Correction and I wish to have my name added to the list of those individuals who agree with the content of the Correction and want to be identified with it.”

Among the priests who have signed the petition are:

  • Fr. Linus F Clovis, Director of the Secretariat for Family and Life
  • Msgr. Prof. Antonio Livi, an Academic of the Holy See and Dean emeritus of the Pontifical Lateran University
  • Fr Serafino M. Lanzetta STD, Lecturer in Dogmatic Theology, Theological Faculty of Lugano, Switzerland
  • Rev. Glen Tattersall, Parish Priest of the Parish of Bl. John Henry Newman from the archdiocese of Melbourne; Rector, St Aloysius’ Church
  • Fr. Don Alfredo Morselli, STL, Parish priest of the archdiocese of Bologna,
  • Fr Luis Eduardo Rodríguez Rodríguez, Parish Priest, Parroquia del Espíritu Santo y N.S. de La Antigua Diocese de Los Teques, Venezuela

The prominent lay scholars and leaders who are part of the initiative include Christopher Ferrara, Founding President of the American Catholic Lawyers’ Association, as well as Prof. Roberto de Mattei, a prominent Vatican historian and former Professor of the History of Christianity, European University of Rome.

The filial correction comes as a “formal correction” of the Pope from cardinals may be imminent.  Cardinal Raymond Burke, one of the dubia Cardinals, said in an interview last August that this “formal correction” would involve a clear presentation of the Church’s teaching on the points at issue, alongside what the Pope is actually saying on those points. “If there is a contradiction, the Roman Pontiff is called to conform his own teaching in obedience to Christ and the Magisterium of the Church,” he said.

“Pope Francis has chosen not to respond to the five dubia, so it is now necessary simply to state what the Church teaches about marriage, the family, acts that are intrinsically evil, and so forth,” Cardinal Burke explained. “These are the points that are not clear in the current teachings of the Roman Pontiff; therefore, this situation must be corrected. The correction would then direct itself principally to those doctrinal points.”

In an interview last September with Australia’s Catholic Outlook, Burke said the need for a response to the dubia is urgent because of the “harm done to souls by the confusion and error.”

“The urgency weighs very heavily on my heart,” he said. ∎

The Editor, Veritas Vincit